Subject: A Pilot, A Navigator, and a Humorist
From: Christopher W. Thomas (poetlaureate@poetic.com)
Host: 209-150-40-31.s31.tnt1.spg.ma.dialup.rcn.com
Date: Wed June 23, 1999 at 1:58PM

A Pilot, A Navigator 

and a Humorist ...

On this day in nineteen hundred and thirty-one
Two men set off in a plane with a single engine
Intending to travel all the way around the world
A feat they accomplished just after a week unfurled

One was an American aviator named Wiley Post
(Who later did the same trip solo ... quite a toast)
The other was an Australian-American aviator ...
Harold Charles Gatty acted as Post's navigator

The trip they went on together was a little shorter
Than Post's solo repeat - undertaken two years later
When he shaved off just about a day from the overall
Even tho' he added over one hundred miles to it all

And then Post took off again just two short years later
With the humorist, Will Rogers - a rather keen aviator
But this time spelled the end for Wiley Post's life of adventure
For the plane went down, killing both, near Point Barrow, Alaska ...

- Tristram

Christopher W. Thomas
12:05pm Wed. June 23rd, 1999

first around-the-world trip -
15,474 miles in 8 days, 15 hours, 51 minutes

second around-the-world trip (solo) -
15,596 miles in 7 days, 18 hours, 49 minutes

the last adventure (with Will Rogers) -
August 15th, 1935 (Post was just 36)

Will Rogers was born in Oologah, OK in 1879.
He made his vaudeville debut in NYC in 1905,
followed by appearances with Ziegfield Follies
after 1914. After the First World War ended in
1918, he went to Hollywood and made 60 films.

Most notable of these are the following:
A Connecticut Yankee - 1931
Down to Earth - 1932
State Fair - 1933
Doctor Bull - 1933 (John Ford directed)
David Harum - 1934
Judge Priest - 1934 (John Ford directed)
Life Begins at 40 - 1935
Steamboat 'Round the Bend - 1935
(John Ford directed ... released posthumously)

Books by Will Rogers include:

The Cowboy Philosopher on Prohibition - 1919
Illiterate Digest - 1924
Will Rogers' Political Follies